Loxahatchee Sunset



Loxahatchee Sunset, originally uploaded by Roberto_Aloi.

Everglades during sunset tonight – Arthur J Marshall Wildlife Refuge

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David and Goliath



David and Goliath, originally uploaded by Roberto_Aloi.

This very unlucky ant was the main course for this very large speckled linx spider. I photographed these two at Okeeheelee on 10/2/11. These spiders were once numerous by the visitors center and I cannot find them anymore. Many of the flowers they frequented seem to have died.

Please visit me on the web elsewhere by clicking the following links:

www.madcalabrian.com
www.robertoaloiphotography.com

Abandoned Building – Pahokee, Florida

Photo was taken of a dilapidated building on Muck City Road taken in Oct of 2011.

You can view the building from google maps by clicking the link below. The building must have been vandalized after google took their photograph.

g.co/maps/gt9p4

Please visit me on the web elsewhere by clicking the following links:

www.madcalabrian.com
www.robertoaloiphotography.com

Bachus’s Inspiration – Highwaymen Landscape

This photograph was taken on 10/15/11 at Riverbend Park in Jupiter. I cannot help to think it was Florida scenery like this that inspired Bachus himself.

One of the original Florida Highwayman, Alfred Hair, was introduced to a prominent white artist named A. E. “Bean” Backus in the mid 1950s. Under the direction of Mr. Backus, Alfred was encouraged to paint landscapes and realized that he could make a living doing it. Alfred encouraged several of his friends to begin painting as well, and soon the Florida Highwaymen became a sort of social group.

The Florida Highwaymen used vivid and bright colors in their paintings to display the beautiful untouched Florida landscape. They painted wind-bent palm trees, serene sunsets, churning oceans and bright red Poinciana trees. These paintings looked great on the walls of businesses and homes.

In the early 1950s through the 1980s a group of twenty-six African-American artists painted beautiful landscapes that displayed the serene, undeveloped Florida landscape of their time. Today these artists are known as the “Florida Highwaymen” and because of the tranquil scenes and history involved, their original paintings are highly demanded by collectors and enthusiasts.

Please visit me on the web elsewhere by clicking the following links:

www.madcalabrian.com
www.robertoaloiphotography.com

Lox – Compact Carpenter Ant 2

Taken at Arthur J Marshall Wildlife Refuge. My goal was to take panorama sunset photos. I drove to my chosen location only to realize I didn’t bring the proper lens for shooting wide angle. Realizing I had my macro I quickly set out in search of insects before the sun went down.

This ant was using it’s tongue to probe the wood surface it was on, It didn’t seem bothered by my presence as I was very close to get this shot. The ant uses it’s tongue to groom itself(and larvae), beg for food, ingest food, give food to others via trophallaxis, and determine the quality of food. My guess there was something on this wood that captured it’s intention. I touched it’s back leg to see if it was still alive after the shot and it marched off.

The antenna of the compact carpenter ant is 12 segmented, with the terminal segment being slightly elongated and bullet-shaped. The scape is longer than the width of the head. Workers vary in size, ranging from 3 to 6 mm in length. Body hairs on the head, thorax and abdomen are abundant, long and golden, with few hairs on the legs and very few on the base of the scape. There is no stinger. The thorax is evenly convex as is characteristic of carpenter ants. The thorax and head are ash brown and the gaster is blackish, as in C. floridanus, but compact carpenter ants are smaller. There is one petiolar segment. This species is in the subfamily Formicinae, tribe Camponotini.

Info from – entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/ants/c_pla natus.htm

Lox – Compact Carpenter Ant 1

Taken at Arthur J Marshall Wildlife Refuge. My goal was to take panorama sunset photos. I drove to my chosen location only to realize I didn’t bring the proper lens for shooting wide angle. Realizing I had my macro I quickly set out in search of insects before the sun went down.

This ant was using it’s tongue to probe the wood surface it was on, It didn’t seem bothered by my presence as I was very close to get this shot. The ant uses it’s tongue to groom itself(and larvae), beg for food, ingest food, give food to others via trophallaxis, and determine the quality of food. My guess there was something on this wood that captured it’s intention. I touched it’s back leg to see if it was still alive after the shot and it marched off.

The antenna of the compact carpenter ant is 12 segmented, with the terminal segment being slightly elongated and bullet-shaped. The scape is longer than the width of the head. Workers vary in size, ranging from 3 to 6 mm in length. Body hairs on the head, thorax and abdomen are abundant, long and golden, with few hairs on the legs and very few on the base of the scape. There is no stinger. The thorax is evenly convex as is characteristic of carpenter ants. The thorax and head are ash brown and the gaster is blackish, as in C. floridanus, but compact carpenter ants are smaller. There is one petiolar segment. This species is in the subfamily Formicinae, tribe Camponotini.

Info from – entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/ants/c_pla natus.htm